The PREDICTS project – We need your data!

As part of my Thesis project I have recently joined up with the researchers and interns of the PREDICTS project. PREDICTS stands for Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (yeah, fancy and down-to-the-point acronym) and is aiming to investigate the impact of various human pressures on biological diversity on a global scale. PREDICTS gets its data from contributing authors and is constantly looking for new data contributors. All contributors will become coauthors of a paper describing the database and  at the end of the project the whole database will be released to the public!

We want your data! For instance Wildcat (Felis sylvestris) encounters over land-use gradients!

We want your data! For instance Wildcat (Felis sylvestris) encounters in different habitat types!

If you have diversity or community composition data collected from more than one terrestrial site which are somehow influenced by humanity and are raised using a standardized methodology, then it is more than likely that we could use it. What we need is the

  • Locations of sampling points, as precisely as possible
    (with the coordinate system used, if possible)
  • An indication of the type of land cover that each sampling point represents
    (e.g. primary forest, secondary forest, intensively-farmed crop, hedgerow)
  • An indication of how intensively the site is used by people
  • Data on the presence / absence, or ideally a measure of abundance, of each species at each site
  • The date(s) that each measurement was taken

We need more openness in terms of data sharing in conservation and ecology research! It is unbelievable that some important research data even today can go lost if for instance the original author died or his lab burned to the ground. Some might argue that it should be mandatory to share data if your research is 100% funded by public sources. Some understandable reasons that speak against data sharing after publication are for instance that you are a young emerging scientist and want to keep your hardly earned golden eggs to yourself. However this can be debated as well as data sharing not only gives you more citations, but maybe even into contact with other researchers in your field. In other cases researchers sometimes don’t want to share raw sampling data because of conservation concerns, but even here there are options to coarsen coordinates before public release.

Recent initiatives on openness in terms of ecological data sharing like https://datadryad.org/ and http://figshare.com/ already provide a splendid place where you as an Author can dump raw data from papers you wrote years ago. You can even place the raw data from your most current projects and put an embargo on the download so that the item will be released to the public for instance one year after the associated article has been published.

Anyway:

For my thesis I am especially looking for all kinds of African community data that has been published. We already have a lot of studies in the database, but for my project i need more data especially of less sampled taxa (insects, amphibians,…), different temporal resolutions and a greater diversity of land-use types.  So especially if you have data on African species communities in any form (diversity metrics, abundance metrics, I even take occurence matrices) which were sampled in somehow anthropogenic disturbed habitats: Please contact me or wait for me to contact you 🙂

Martin Jung

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , ,

About Martin Jung

PhD researcher at the University of Sussex. Interested in nature conservation, ecology and biodiversity as well as statistics, GIS and 'big data'

2 responses to “The PREDICTS project – We need your data!”

  1. Dan says :

    Hi, I may be able to contribute some data from Malawi. Please contact me.

    • Curlew says :

      Great, will do. You will get a mail from me soon. I am in Kenya and Tanzania for the next 2 months thus my internet-connection is a bit slow

Sussex Research Hive

Supporting the research community at the University of Sussex

Small Pond Science

Research, teaching, and mentorship in the sciences

Landscape Ecology 2.0

intersecting landscape ecology, open science, and R

nexus

The Research Blog of IIASA

Jörg Steinkamps Blog

Mainly things about R, Linux and vegetation modeling

Amy Whitehead's Research

the ecological musings of a conservation biologist

Michael McCarthy's Research

School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne

The Rostrum

science, statistics, policy and more

marionpfeifer

Environmental Change - Understand, Predict, Adapt

Dynamic Ecology

Multa novit vulpes

metvurst

METeorological Visualisation Utilities using R for Science and Teaching

A Birder´s Blog

"Everybody loves what they know"

Trust Me, I'm a Geographer

Using Technology to Explore Our World

Duncan Golicher's weblog

Research, scripts and life in Chiapas

%d bloggers like this: