Tag Archive | conservation ecology

New paper: A first global assessment of remaining biodiversity intactness

Anthropogenic land use is one of the dominant drivers of ongoing biodiversity loss on a global scale and it has often been asked how much biodiversity loss is “too much” for sustaining ecosystem function. Our new paper in the journal Science came out last week and attempts to quantify for the first time the global biodiversity intactness within the planetary boundary framework. I am absolutely delighted to have contributed to this study and it received quite a bit of media attention so far ( https://www.altmetric.com/details/9708902 ) with a number of nice articles in the BBC and the Guardian.

Biodiversity intactness of ecological assemblages for species abundance. Source: Newbold et al. 2016

Biodiversity intactness of ecological assemblages for species abundance. Source: Newbold et al. 2016

In our study we calculated the Biodiversity intactness index (BII) first proposed by Scholes and Biggs (2005) for the entire world using the local biodiversity estimates from the PREDICTS project and combined them with the best available down-scaled land-use information to date. We find that many terrestrial biomes are already well beyond the proposed biodiversity planetary boundary (previously defined and set as a precautionary 10% reduction of biodiversity intactness). Unless these ongoing trends are decelerated and stopped in the near future it is likely that biodiversity loss might corroborate national and international biodiversity conservation targets, ecosystem functioning and long-term sustainable development.

  • Newbold, Tim, et al. “Has land use pushed terrestrial biodiversity beyond the planetary boundary? A global assessment.” Science 353.6296 (2016): 288-291. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf2201
  • Scholes, R. J., and R. Biggs. “A biodiversity intactness index.” Nature 434.7029 (2005): 45-49. DOI: 10.1038/nature03289

The PREDICTS project – We need your data!

As part of my Thesis project I have recently joined up with the researchers and interns of the PREDICTS project. PREDICTS stands for Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems (yeah, fancy and down-to-the-point acronym) and is aiming to investigate the impact of various human pressures on biological diversity on a global scale. PREDICTS gets its data from contributing authors and is constantly looking for new data contributors. All contributors will become coauthors of a paper describing the database and  at the end of the project the whole database will be released to the public!

We want your data! For instance Wildcat (Felis sylvestris) encounters over land-use gradients!

We want your data! For instance Wildcat (Felis sylvestris) encounters in different habitat types!

If you have diversity or community composition data collected from more than one terrestrial site which are somehow influenced by humanity and are raised using a standardized methodology, then it is more than likely that we could use it. What we need is the

  • Locations of sampling points, as precisely as possible
    (with the coordinate system used, if possible)
  • An indication of the type of land cover that each sampling point represents
    (e.g. primary forest, secondary forest, intensively-farmed crop, hedgerow)
  • An indication of how intensively the site is used by people
  • Data on the presence / absence, or ideally a measure of abundance, of each species at each site
  • The date(s) that each measurement was taken

We need more openness in terms of data sharing in conservation and ecology research! It is unbelievable that some important research data even today can go lost if for instance the original author died or his lab burned to the ground. Some might argue that it should be mandatory to share data if your research is 100% funded by public sources. Some understandable reasons that speak against data sharing after publication are for instance that you are a young emerging scientist and want to keep your hardly earned golden eggs to yourself. However this can be debated as well as data sharing not only gives you more citations, but maybe even into contact with other researchers in your field. In other cases researchers sometimes don’t want to share raw sampling data because of conservation concerns, but even here there are options to coarsen coordinates before public release.

Recent initiatives on openness in terms of ecological data sharing like https://datadryad.org/ and http://figshare.com/ already provide a splendid place where you as an Author can dump raw data from papers you wrote years ago. You can even place the raw data from your most current projects and put an embargo on the download so that the item will be released to the public for instance one year after the associated article has been published.

Anyway:

For my thesis I am especially looking for all kinds of African community data that has been published. We already have a lot of studies in the database, but for my project i need more data especially of less sampled taxa (insects, amphibians,…), different temporal resolutions and a greater diversity of land-use types.  So especially if you have data on African species communities in any form (diversity metrics, abundance metrics, I even take occurence matrices) which were sampled in somehow anthropogenic disturbed habitats: Please contact me or wait for me to contact you 🙂

Martin Jung

Welcome

Hi dear Reader,

i just opened a WordPress blog once again, but this time i’m gonna write in english and a little bit more than just personal stuff. The point of this blog will be that i post interesting facts and methods about Conservation and Ecology and everything that interacts between them. What does that mean? In general Conservation Ecology is branch of Conservation Biology which can be defined as “The scientific study of the conservation of biological diversity and the effects of humans on the environment.”. In Conservation Ecology you use ecological methods to test hypothesis of Conservation Biology.

Furthermore you will also find some stuff i made myself and info about my research on this blog. The overall language will be in a quite scientific style, but i still hope that it will be understandable for everyone interested. So stay tuned if you want to hear great news about Conservation Ecology.

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