Tag Archive | publication

New publication: LecoS now with own reference

As I can see my QGIS plugin LecoS is still widely used and downloaded from the QGIS plugin hub. I have noticed that some people already started referencing ether my blog or the QGIS repository in their outputs, which is fine, but after thinking about it for a while I thought why not make a little descriptive article out of it (being an upstart PhD scholar and scientist an’ all). I am now happy to announce that this article has passed scientific peer-review and is now been published in early view in the Journal of Ecological Informatics.

LecoS — A python plugin for automated landscape ecology analysis

The quantification of landscape structures from remote-sensing products is an important part of many analyses in landscape ecology studies. This paper introduces a new free and open-source tool for conducting landscape ecology analysis. LecoS is able to compute a variety of basic and advanced landscape metrics in an automatized way. The calculation can furthermore be partitioned by iterating through an optional provided polygon layer. The new tool is integrated into the QGIS processing framework and can thus be used as a stand-alone tool or within bigger complex models. For illustration a potential case-study is presented, which tries to quantify pollinator responses on landscape derived metrics at various scales.

The following link provided by Elsevier is still active until the 23 of January 2016. If you need a copy later on and don’t have access to the journal (sorry, I didn’t have the money to pay for open-access fees), then feel free to ether contact me or you can read an earlier prePrint of the manuscript on PeerJ.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoinf.2015.11.006
So if you are using LecoS in any way for your work, it would be nice if you could reference it using the citation below. That shows me that people are actively using it and gives me incentives to keep on developing it in the future.

Martin Jung, LecoS — A python plugin for automated landscape ecology analysis, Ecological Informatics, Volume 31, January 2016, Pages 18-21, ISSN 1574-9541, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoinf.2015.11.006.

The full sourcecode of LecoS is released on github.

The PREDICTS database: a global database of how local terrestrial biodiversity responds to human impacts

New article in which I am also involved. I have told the readers of the blog about the PREDICTS initiative before. Well, the open-access article describing the last stand of the database has just been released as early-view article. So if you are curious about one of the biggest databases in the world investigating impacts of anthropogenic pressures on biodiversity, please have a look. As we speak the data is used to define new quantitative indices of global biodiversity decline valid for multiple taxa (and not only vertebrates like WWF living planet index).


http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.1303/abstract

Abstract

Biodiversity continues to decline in the face of increasing anthropogenic pressures such as habitat destruction, exploitation, pollution and introduction of alien species. Existing global databases of species’ threat status or population time series are dominated by charismatic species. The collation of datasets with broad taxonomic and biogeographic extents, and that support computation of a range of biodiversity indicators, is necessary to enable better understanding of historical declines and to project – and avert – future declines. We describe and assess a new database of more than 1.6 million samples from 78 countries representing over 28,000 species, collated from existing spatial comparisons of local-scale biodiversity exposed to different intensities and types of anthropogenic pressures, from terrestrial sites around the world. The database contains measurements taken in 208 (of 814) ecoregions, 13 (of 14) biomes, 25 (of 35) biodiversity hotspots and 16 (of 17) megadiverse countries. The database contains more than 1% of the total number of all species described, and more than 1% of the described species within many taxonomic groups – including flowering plants, gymnosperms, birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, beetles, lepidopterans and hymenopterans. The dataset, which is still being added to, is therefore already considerably larger and more representative than those used by previous quantitative models of biodiversity trends and responses. The database is being assembled as part of the PREDICTS project (Projecting Responses of Ecological Diversity In Changing Terrestrial Systems – www.predicts.org.uk). We make site-level summary data available alongside this article. The full database will be publicly available in 2015.

PS:
I know that I haven’t been particular active on this blog in the last months. I am currently quite busy with writing my Thesis and programming. I am gonna make it up later 🙂
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